Shaved vs hairy pussy

Duration: 9min 20sec Views: 836 Submitted: 06.05.2020
Category: Fetish
The bane of many a woman's existence. Sometimes, it's just easier to let it all grow out especially in the winter. Who's really looking? Even though it's fairly obvious that it's your call whether or not you want to rock a full-on bush or give yourself a Brazilian — or if you want to let your leg hair grow out free as the wind or if you'd rather keep your legs silky and smooth — it's always at least a little interesting to know what men think about it. And, lo and behold, in a recent Reddit thread , men revealed what their true feelings are when it comes to women who forfeit their razors. Their answers might surprise you

To shave or not to shave down there? I won't let porn trends decide

Stacey Solomon: I haven’t shaved my lady garden in 10 years and now I'm back in fashion

MANY spend a fortune on waxing and expensive laser treatments to maintain a hairless appearance. And in a world that strives for hairless perfection, Stacey Solomon , 30, has become a breath of fresh for the masses as she waxes lyrical about embracing her hairy legs, "lady garden" and "fuzzy chin". In , the Loose Women panellist kick started the discussion surrounding body hair, candidly sharing her struggle with trying to maintain a hairless appearance since puberty. But following the release of her autobiography, Happily Imperfect, two years ago, the ITV star has become a body hair hero for many as she shuns female grooming. Now Stacey has become a beacon of body positivity as she urges her three million Instagram followers to be happy in their skin, hairy legs and all, with her plethora of refreshingly honest posts. And amid the coronavirus quarantine, Stacey has continued her message with wit admitting she won't shave her legs until she's out of lockdown and back to the Loose Women studios.

Stacey Solomon: I haven’t shaved my lady garden in 10 years… and now I’m back in fashion

I remember biking to the Korean nail salon every three weeks in high school so that a woman could sear off my film of mustache and thick eyebrows, chastising me if I waited too long. Their teasing made me feel bestial. Soon my friends and I all went to liberal colleges, where we read Simone de Beauvoir and plastered posters of Frida Kahlo to our dorm walls, her unibrow and facial mustache a symbol for her hairy resistance of the white patriarchy. But if my leg hair was a statement, it was only a statement of my laziness.
At last our natural, pheromone-catching, abrasion, injury and pathogen-protecting locks can be celebrated rather than causing offence. I find shaving in general an utter chore so even removing the hair on the body parts that are on display happens on the rarest of occasions. My grandfather is from Burma and while the tanned skin and Cleopatra eyes skipped my genetic make-up, I inherited the full hairy gene. My mum finally let me wax when I went up to senior school and it was barbaric.