Hiv infection from oral sex

Duration: 4min 30sec Views: 732 Submitted: 20.06.2020
Category: Small Tits
The chances of transmitting HIV through oral sex are very low. It is also possible to take further preventive measures, such as using a condom. HIV is a virus that spreads through bodily fluids. A person can contract HIV through direct contact with infected fluids or sharing syringes with someone who has the virus. In this article, we discuss whether it is possible to transmit HIV through oral sex and provide some tips for prevention.

Can you get HIV through oral sex?

Resource: HIV FAQs - San Francisco AIDS Foundation

As the risk of transmission through oral sex is estimated to be much lower than for vaginal and anal intercourse in the absence of antiretroviral therapy, it is implausible that the risk of transmission through oral sex is not affected in the same way as other sexual transmission risks when effective treatment suppresses viral load. When HIV is not fully supressed, the risk of HIV transmission through the mouth is certainly smaller than through vaginal or anal intercourse. If undamaged, the tissues of the mouth and throat are thought to be less susceptible to infection than genital or anal tissues, and an enzyme in saliva also acts to inhibit HIV. Very few cases of transmission through oral sex have been reported amongst gay men despite the continued practice of oral sex often with ejaculation into the mouth by large numbers of men over many years. There are no reliable reports of HIV being transmitted from the mouth to the genitals. Cases of transmission via cunnilingus are extremely rare, and the reliability of these reports is questionable.

Oral Sex and HIV Risk

The virus is transmitted between partners when the fluids of one person come into contact with the blood stream of another person. This contact can occur from a cut or broken skin, or through the tissues of the vagina, rectum, foreskin, or the opening of the penis. Oral sex ranks very low on the list of ways HIV can be transmitted. However, the risk of contracting HIV through oral sex is not zero. The truth is, you can in theory still contract HIV this way.
HIV infects humans and causes damage by taking over cells in the immune system—the part of the body that usually works to fight off germs, bacteria and disease. When that happens, the body may not be able to fight off certain types of illnesses or cancers. If the infection is not detected and treated, the immune system gradually weakens and AIDS develops.